…and that is why our product exists

what goes before the 3 dots for your business? I don’t mean some bullshit about the big ‘why?’ that marketers have become infatuated talking about (thanks Sinek). I mean, from your customer’s view, why should I buy what you sell? What is the reason? The answer doesn’t come down to …

The one about the £217 bar of chocolate (+ free shipping)

What’s the price of a bar of chocolate? 50p, £1.00? Not a box… but a bar. And the price of a good bottle of wine? £10 from the local store? £25 at your favourite restaurant? Price expectations are already set before you introduce a product to your customer. For products …

Great marketing should take place after the sale too…

The old value propositions of quick delivery, best prices and easy returns are now the standards. You can’t create competitive advantage based upon delivery when the likes of Amazon exist. Customer expectations have already been set. So, we need to think and behave more creatively, more personably. The one thing …

Addressing the inbalance between customer acquisition and retention

I believe, as marketers, we spend too much time focused on new customer acquisition and too little time on retaining our customers. To the extent it shackles business growth. I spend my days listening to how acquisition costs are rocketing, how customers are becoming harder and harder to convert. And …

In the great pop-up debate should we let logic dictate?

Ugly discussions take place regarding the use of ecommerce pop-ups. From the informed ‘I hate sites that use popups’ to the evangelical guarantees of 10x growth, opinion is divided. Here’s the problem. As a tactic, yes pop-ups are intrusive and can often disrupt purchasing processes when used incorrectly. Playing their …

When discount codes work

Discount codes have become a default conversion optimisation tactic. Give people 10% off and there’s a greater likelihood they’ll purchase. Or so the methodology goes. 10% discount equates to £100k revenue given away for a £1m turnover business. That’s a lot of gifting. The problem, as I see it, is …